Setting The Record Straight on Meat Health

Red meat is often wrongly portrayed as being unhealthy. Even chicken has been getting attacked by some in the media as being unhealthy or not environmentally friendly. Vegan, fish and other non-meat diets have been proposed as healthier alternatives. The result of this onslaught of negative meat messages has influenced many persons including moms and dads to drastically cut back on their meat and poultry purchases. Perceptions may be seen as reality, yet truth trumps non truths. Parents and other consumers want what is best for their health and that of their families. They are also aware that a lot of false information is out there and as such are open to scientific facts that can correct their misconceptions. Below are the facts:

A) LETS IRON OUT THE TRUTH ON MEAT!
1) “You would need to eat a massive amount of spinach to equal (the iron content) in a steak,” says Christopher Golden, an ecologist and epidemiologist at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. (As quoted by nature.com in the article ‘Brain food- clever eating’.)
2) Let’s get precise. For a woman to receive her recommended daily intake of 18 mg of iron would need just 300 grams of cooked bovine liver, 625 grams of cooked beef or an astounding 2.4 kg of spinach!
3) In addition, the Iron found in vegetables is harder to absorb than the iron found in meat as it is attached to fibre which inhibits its absorption.

B) MEAT FOR A HEALTHIER BRAIN!
1) Being deficient in the micronutrients found in meat have been linked with low IQ, autism, depression and dementia says Dr. Charlotte Neumann, a pediatrician at the University of California, as quoted in the above article.
2) Zinc found in meat is crucial for learning and memory.
3) Vitamin B12 found in meat preserves the sheaths that protect nerves.

C) MEAT- BOOST YOUR IMMUNITY!
Due to its antioxidant powers, zinc is involved in creating antibodies to fight free radicals that increase our risk for chronic diseases.

D) MEAT- POWER YOUR MUSCLE GROWTH!
1) The protein in meat helps build and repair body tissues.
2) Muscles are made of protein. That is why athletes who are building muscle strength increase their meat protein consumption.
3) The protein and zinc found in meat are important for muscle growth and repair.

E) MEAT- THE COMPLETE PROTEIN!
Meat contains all of the nine essential amino acids that your body cannot make by itself. Say ‘hello’ to histidine, leucine, isoleucine, lycine, methionine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, threonine, and valine. Meat supplies all nine. That is why it is called a complete protein.

F) MEAT- FOR A HEALTHY HEART!
1) Meat contains lots of the B vitamins needed for the production of hormones, red blood cells and for the proper functioning of your nervous system.
2) Say ‘hello’ to niacin, folic acid, thiamine, biotin, panthothenic acid, vitamin B12 and vitamin B6. They are all found in meat.

So let’s counter those negative meat health myths, by setting the record straight.

Why Adequate Foot Care Is Important

Your feet may seem like the last part of your body that needs nourishment and care. After all, they can withstand the daily beating of walking, standing and running. The years of use have made them hard and resilient to sharp rocks, burning, sun-scorched sand and ill-fitting heels.

When there are cuts, bruises and blisters on the feet, they seem to heal quickly, though the process may be uncomfortable.

It is during these times of healing that we realize how important our feet are and that it doesn’t take much to temporarily hinder their proper functioning.

More serious injuries such as a broken leg or foot, can greatly affect our quality of life by making us partially immobile.

Our feet are important, and so often we take the health and proper functioning of our feet for granted. It doesn’t take much, however, to hinder or take away our ability to stand and move.

Much of the common foot ailments are the result of poor foot care, often in the form of ill-fitting shoes. Another cause of common foot issues is bacteria build-up and poor toenail care.

Taking care of your feet is important. Here are some reasons why:

Prevent disease and infections
Prevent injury
Provide proactive treatment for possible, foot issues

What is Adequate Foot Care

Taking care of your feet may sound easy, and it is, which means that anyone can do it, anytime.

Here are some ways you can take care of your feet:

Do a foot self-exam. Spend two minutes or less physically examining each foot. Look for any lesions, sores, cuts, bruises, etc. Then rub and apply pressure to various parts of the foot, feeling for knots or sensitive areas.

Wear properly-fitting shoes. Be sure to have shoes that aren’t too small. Shoes that are too small can cause bunions, calluses and issues with the toenails, among others.

Avoid wearing high heels when possible. If you’re at a party or in a business dress office, there are foldable flats that you can whip out of your purse and wear in place of the heels.

Wear socks. If your feet are prone to excessive moisture, or you’re about to work-out, wear cushioned, moisture-wicking socks to avoid blisters and bacteria-ridden, smelly feet.

Thoroughly clean your feet every day. A day of being in warm, confined shoes can make the feet smelly, sweaty and bacteria-ridden.

Proper cutting of toenails. Clipping one’s toenails can be like pulling teeth. It can be tedious, and depending on the conditions of one’s toenails, downright gross. However, toenails and toenail bed will have lower risks of breakage, chipping and injury if the toenails are properly cut short.

Have foot powder handy. Foot powder is essential for anyone with an active lifestyle or who has issues controlling the overabundance of sweat and odor.

Regularly massage your feet. After self-examining your feet, a firm, but gentle massage of one’s feet can work out the kinks, knots and stiffness of the feet. Plus, your feet work hard each day. Reward them.

Your feet are important and essential for everyday living. The routine care of them will help protect them from injury and disease and keep them functioning properly for many more years to come.

The Changing Face of Healthcare

Several significant forces in the last several years have been changing the way healthcare has and will continue to be delivered. The emergence of more unique ways to deliver care such as clinics incorporated into businesses and factories, the increased use of mid-level providers (nurse practitioners & physician assistants), the increase integration of technologies such as telemedicine and robotics and the shift from interventional reimbursement to outcomes reimbursement are just a few examples.

Compounding these are the ever-increasing costs of healthcare, the strain of funding Medicare on the U.S. economy, and the complications of insurance and healthcare payments under the affordable care act, ACA.

This has led to changes in how businesses intend to interface with the healthcare system going forward. CVS’s acquisition of Aetna will try to leverage healthcare delivery through their pharmacy structure. United Healthcare’s acquisition of DaVita hopes to leverage cost containment and resource control by directly controlling physicians. And the recently announced collaboration among Berkshire Hathaway, Amazon and J.P. Morgan Chase presents a yet unknown structure whose stated goals is improved quality and less cost. How they will implement their strategy is yet to emerge.

The decline in hospital admission over the last several decades has further led to restructuring by hospital corporations such as Tenet. Premise Health has emerged as a company placing physicians and other healthcare providers directly in corporate/business offices.

The big question then with these new ventures are how do organizations know what works financially and how do they track performance… In other words, how do you track, measure and value the relationships between cost and outcomes?

How can the analyst measure which methods(s) may generate better or best outcomes?

A simple return on investment, ROI, calculation will not provide needed nor valid insights. However, the use of cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) would provide quite useful, valid and actionable information. CEA uses decision tree models to compare not only cost outcomes but effectiveness outcomes of various treatments on patient health and even on future healthcare usage based on various current actions. It can further be used to determine how effective a set amount of money spent on a particular treatment or method will impact outcomes (i.e. willingness to pay calculation). CEA models are flexible and can incorporate a wide variety of scenarios. As opposed to Big Data, CEA makes use of Broad Data so that comparisons of treatment modalities can be evaluated using real life outcomes. It can compare effects on a discrete problem such as a cancer tumor, or on chronic ongoing diseases such as COPD or CHF.

As the delivery of effective yet profitable, or at least cost effective, healthcare becomes more challenging, methods for evaluating treatments and programs become more necessary if not essential. Methods must be implemented to evaluate these new treatments and programs once they are in place so adjustments can be made. CEA enable organizations to both initially evaluate and subsequently monitor new methods and programs in a meaningful way.